Donnerstag Digest (August 12, 2010)

This week in the blogosphere:

  • Baker acquires Hendrickson’s academic arm (HT: Nijay Gupta and Rod Decker).
  • Larry Hurtado rightfully lauds and recommends careful attention to Harry Gable’s Books and Readers in the Early Church.
  • Cynthia Nielsen continues her discussion of interconnections between Joerg Rieger and Frederick Douglass with a post about duality in identity construction.
  • Michael Halcomb has a new website specifically dedicated to Getting (Theological) Languages.
  • Kirk Lowery returns to the biblioblogosphere after a hiatus for the development of the Groves Center as an independent research unit. I had the privilege of doing an Aramaic and a Hebrew Bible text-linguistics seminar under Kirk and am again looking forward to seeing what shows up on his “scratchpad.”
  • Happy Dissertating suggests PhD2Published as a potentially valuable resource for new PhD graduates in humanities disciplines.
  • James McGrath spots several video recordings of presentations at this past year’s annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion.
  • Michael Bird starts reading a recent biography of Ernst Käsemann and reproduces several, brief quotations from Käsemann that are, as one might expect, particularly insightful.
  • Todd Bolen reports a recent spectrometric analysis that suggests a Jerusalem origin for a newly discovered cuneiform tablet.
  • Ken Schenck discusses the reading of biblical literature as Christian scripture.
  • Brian LePort discusses the relationship between scripture and tradition in view of the Trinitarian-Oneness debate. On this relationship, our Writing Center director at Southeastern recently brought to my attention F. F. Bruce’s edited volume, Holy Scripture and Holy Tradition. I have yet really to peruse it, and the book is scarcely findable in print at this point. Still, it does look like a very interesting volume, and much of it is available through Google Books.
  • Google and Verizon propose, regarding Net Neutrality,”that ‘wireline broadband providers [sh]ould not be able to discriminate against or prioritize lawful Internet content, applications or services in a way that causes harm to users or competition’, but broadband providers [sh]ould be able to offer ‘additional, differentiated online services’.”
  • Chris Brady shares some of his conclusions from his recent International Organization for Targumic Studies presentation about Boaz in Targum Ruth.

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2 Replies to “Donnerstag Digest (August 12, 2010)”

    1. My pleasure. Scripture and tradition is a fascinating and multifaceted issue, especially for those of us who want to be responsible Protestants. So, thank you for providing some well-considered thoughts on the issue.

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