Citing Electronic Journals with Individually Paginated Articles

There are several good online journals that publish articles that are paginated separately from each other, rather than running the pagination continuously through a given issue (or volume). Just a couple are the HTS Teologiese Studies and Scriptura (at least in recent volumes).

AltTypewriter by Pereanu Sebastian

I’ve tended to treat these as though they all appeared at the beginning of a given issue (all starting with page “1”). But, SBL Press has clarified that this isn’t their most preferred way to treat this situation.

For articles in online journals that aren’t paginated in series, the preferred note form for the first reference to this type of article is:

[Author name], “[Title],” [Journal] [Journal volume] ([Journal volume year]): art. [Article number in the journal volume], [“p.” or “pp.” according to whether one or multiple pages is cited] [Page number], [Full DOI URL as a live link].

Thus, one example would be:

Ntozakhe Simon Cezula, “Waiting for the Lord: The Fulfilment of the Promise of Land in the Old Testament as a Source of Hope,” Scr.(S) 116 (2017): art. 3, pp. 1–15, http://dx.doi.org/10.7833/116-1-1304.

Subsequent references are constructed in the same way as they would be for any continuously paginated journal article.

To get the initial citation above from this bibliographic record, I had to adjust the default Zotero output for the SBL style by: (a) making “.3” into “art. 3,”—although this article isn’t in an “issue,” this seemed the best way to store it in the database—(b) adding “pp.” before the page references, and (c) adding “, http://dx.doi.org/10.7833/116-1-1304” after the page reference.

The corresponding bibliography format would be:

Cezula, Ntozakhe Simon. “Waiting for the Lord: The Fulfilment of the Promise of Land in the Old Testament as a Source of Hope.” Scr.(S) 116 (2017): art. 3, pp. 1–15. http://dx.doi.org/10.7833/116-1-1304.

For additional information, see both Electronic Journals with Individually Paginated Articles and HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies on the SBL Handbook of Style blog.

I wonder if there may need to be a new item or data type created in Zotero to support constructing this type of citation without this additional massaging.

Or, do you other Zotero users have other insights about ways of getting closer to output above with the software and the SBL style as they stand?

Update: Brenton Wiernik suggested the following excellent workaround via Twitter.

In the Twitter discussion above, the URL I mention should be the DOI URL. But, Twitter has presented a shortened version automatically.

Discussion of this citation situation is also now pending in the Zotero forums.

Inside “Yes” is “No”

We like to be able to say “yes,” whether it’s to a person, an organization, an activity, an object, or whatever. But, human experience works out such that inside any “yes” is also a “no.”

AltWall, black, graffiti and sign by Jon Tyson

A bias toward “yes” isn’t inherently bad. It keeps us moving forward. Where we start running into trouble is when we neglect the fact that “yes” also costs us something.

This cost is sometimes described as an “opportunity cost.” Often, the concept is illustrated with economic examples. For instance, any dollar spent on a purchase is, by definition, not saved, given away, or spent on some other purchase.

Because dollars are interchangeable, this “opportunity cost” might not mean too much. But, the reality gains teeth when we also come up against the fact that the number of dollars anyone has access to is limited. Eventually, resources run out, even despite occasional efforts simply to go on pursuing more (see, e.g., Collins, How the Mighty Fall, 45–64).

The same principle applies with time and commitments. We can only fit a finite number of things into our attention at any moment. We can only pursue a finite number of actions in a given space of time.

And whatever we decide to put our attention on or to put into action then, by definition, squeezes out of that time and attention whatever else would otherwise have been there. So, for instance, time and attention spent studying can’t then also be spent in other ways.

But, investing time and attention in activities like study definitely can let us engage better with life as a result. To cite an often and variously quoted illustration:

Suppose you were to come upon someone in the woods working feverishly to saw down a tree.
“What are you doing?” you ask.
“Can’t you see?” comes the impatient reply. “I’m sawing down this tree.”
“You look exhausted!” you exclaim. “How long have you been at it?”
“Over five hours,” he returns, “and I’m beat! This is hard work.”
“Well, why don’t you take a break for a few minutes and sharpen that saw?” you inquire. “I’m sure it would go a lot faster.”
“I don’t have time to sharpen the saw,” the man says emphatically. “I’m too busy sawing!” (Covey, Effective People, 299)

Like anything, time spent “sharpening the saw” in study has its own opportunity cost that we need to be mindful of. But, it also pays dividends in making us sharper and better prepared as we continue moving forward serving and living life in biblical studies.

What encourages you to devote yourself to “sharpening the saw”?

What Is Essential?

The beginning of the school year is a natural time to take stock of what lies ahead. Demands mount (or are about to). Seasonal free time from the summer diminishes.

How can we stay afloat? How can we avoid dropping balls as challenges ramp up?

There isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer. But, a helpful question to begin asking regularly is “What is essential?”

AltArrow on factory wall by Hello I’m Nik

The question “What is essential?” pushes us in the direction of minimizing the excess in life. But, it does so in a way that also asks us to keep hold of what holds higher priority.

Rather than trying to fit more and more into a life with less and less margin, the question “What is essential?” asks us to reckon with the reality of our limits—both as humans in general and as particular humans with particular things that are important to us.

In his book Essentialism, Greg McKeown reflects,

When we try to do it all and have it all, we find ourselves making trade-offs at the margins that we would never take on as our intentional strategy. When we don’t purposefully and deliberately choose where to focus our energies and time, other people … will choose for us, and before long, we’ll have lost sight of everything that is meaningful and important. We can either make our choices deliberately or allow other people’s agendas to control our lives. (16)

Of course, some of what we should choose deliberately is connecting with, enjoy relationships with, and serving our families, close friends, and others with whom we can engage in mercy.

The point isn’t that we shouldn’t do this. But for instance, the quite definite forces in the modern “attention economy” have very certain “agendas” that we can unwittingly “allow … to control our lives” in ways we wouldn’t choose if we were being deliberate.

And just by virtue of faithfulness to whatever calling we find on our lives or in a particular season, it behooves us to be mindful about the choices that we make and what we allow to become a priority such that it excludes or squeezes other important relationships, activities, and practices.

Whatever we’re called to do in any circumstance, it pretty safely isn’t, as Dietrich Bonhoeffer put it, to be “always forced to decide between alternatives [we] have not chosen” because we’ve not exercised our responsibility to live intentionally (Prisoner for God, 175). So, as we move into another academic year, let’s be mindful of what we allow ourselves to prioritize and intentional about centralizing what lets us live faithfully to whatever calling we have.

What questions or criteria do you find helpful in minimizing the non-essential?

Codex Marchalianus

The Vatican Library has made available a digital facsimile of Codex Marchalianus (7th–8th c.). The codex contains some prefatory material and the text of the prophets, including Baruch and the Letter of Jeremiah. Each page has two scans with alternate lighting. Below is a sample of the marginalia from Isa 25:8 (leaf 231) that notes the alternate readings for the passage in Theodotion (top) and Aquila (bottom).

Codex Marchalianus marginalia at Isa 25:8

It is (proto-)Theodotion’s reading that Paul reflects in 1 Cor 15:54. On this passage, see also the recent survey by John Meade.

Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on the Twelve Prophets

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Cyril of Alexandria (d. 444) probably wrote his Commentary on the Twelve Prophets sometime before 428 (ODCC, s.v. “Cyril, St”; Robert C. Hill, trans., Cyril of Alexandria: Commentary on the Twelve, 1:4). The commentary is available in J.-P. Migne’s Patrologia Graeca via Documenta Catholica Omnia:

The two-volume critical edition of Philip Pusey (Clarendon, 1868) is also available via Google Books:

Field’s Edition of Origen’s Hexapla

Since 1875, Frederick Field’s edition of Origen’s Hexapla has been the standard reference for the work. A new edition is in preparation under the auspices of the Hexapla Project. But, for the present, Field’s work remains an invaluable resource. His two-volume edition is available via Internet Archive.

N.B.: The Internet Archive link in the Hexapla Project’s “Editions of the Hexaplaric Fragments” goes only to a page that provides only Field’s first volume, containing Genesis–Esther. The second volume, containing Job–Malachi, is available on a separate page.