The Fusion of Rhetoric and Hermeneutics

At first glance, rhetoric and hermeneutics are quite different things. Rhetoric deals with argument and persuasion, hermeneutics with examination and understanding. But, if we look more closely, they comingle in a way that makes them inseparable. Original abstract painting by Vanessa Ives To begin, both rhetorical and hermeneutical reflection take the form of considering existing […]

Aune on enthymemes in New Testament scholarship

In a helpful 2003 essay, David Aune discusses “the use and abuse of the enthymeme in New Testament scholarship” (New Testament Studies 49, no. 3, 299–320). According to the article’s abstract, Though the enthymeme is usually defined as a truncated syllogism, that definition does not go back to Aristotle. By the first century CE there […]

Cope’s introduction to Aristotle’s “Rhetoric”

E. M. Cope’s 1867 introduction to Aristotle’s Rhetoric (London: MacMillan) is available via Internet Archive in several different scans digitized by Google from Harvard University, Google from an unknown library, Google from the British Library, Google from the University of Michigan, and MSN from the University of Toronto.

Bitzer on the “enthymeme” in Aristotle’s rhetorical theory

Much ink has been spilled in attempting to define the enigmatic category of “enthymeme” that plays such an important role in Aristotle’s rhetorical theory. Aristotle calls enthymemes “the body of proof” (Aristotle, Rhet. 1354a [Freese, LCL]; σῶμα τῆς πίστεως), but nowhere explicitly defines the category. The typical “textbook definition” tends to try to define enthymemes […]

Burkett on Aristotle’s “Rhetoric”

Texas Christian University’s open, online thesis repository contains John Burkett’s treatment of Book III of Aristotle’s Retoric. The project is a commentary-style work on that book that strives to complete the project that William Grimaldi began with Books I and II. According to the abstract, This new commentary on Aristotle’s Rhetoric III serves the purpose which […]