Daily Gleanings: Digital Humanities (19 August 2019)

Now out from De Gruyter via open access is Monica Berti’s edited volume, Digital Classical Philology: Ancient Greek and Latin in the Digital Revolution. According to the publisher’s description,

Thanks to the digital revolution, even a traditional discipline like philology has been enjoying a renaissance within academia and beyond. Decades of work have been producing groundbreaking results, raising new research questions and creating innovative educational resources. This book describes the rapidly developing state of the art of digital philology with a focus on Ancient Greek and Latin, the classical languages of Western culture. Contributions cover a wide range of topics about the accessibility and analysis of Greek and Latin sources. The discussion is organized in five sections concerning open data of Greek and Latin texts; catalogs and citations of authors and works; data entry, collection and analysis for classical philology; critical editions and annotations of sources; and finally linguistic annotations and lexical databases. As a whole, the volume provides a comprehensive outline of an emergent research field for a new generation of scholars and students, explaining what is reachable and analyzable that was not before in terms of technology and accessibility.

HT: AWOL


The Epigraphic Database Falsae

is an electronic archive of forged ancient inscriptions. It is the main output of the Forged Evidence (False Testimonianze) research project, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University, and Research (MIUR) in 2017.

The EDF concerns all known typologies of forged inscriptions. These include intentional forgeries, copies of ancient inscriptions, Medieval and Renaissance inscriptions that imitate classical models, modern transcriptions, reproductions, and facsimiles of thousands of forgeries. They include a variety of materials: although intentional forgeries are most frequently written solely on paper, they can also be inscribed on actual objects including ancient or only partially ancient materials as well as more recent artefacts. (Digital Classicist Wiki)

HT: AWOL

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