Daily Gleanings: New Releases (26 June 2019)

Cover image for Newly available from SBL Press is Gideon R. Kotzé, Wolfgang Kraus, and Michaël N. van der Meer’s edited collection, XVI Congress of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies: Stellenbosch, 2016. According to the Press,

This book includes papers given at the XVI Congress of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies (IOSCS), held in Stellenbosch, South Africa, in 2016. Essays by scholars from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America identify and discuss new topics and lines of inquiry and develop fresh insights and arguments in existing areas of research into the Septuagint and cognate literature. This is an important new resource for scholars and students who are interested in different methods of studying the literature included in the Septuagint corpora, the theology and reception of these texts, as well as the works of Josephus.


Matthew Crawford’s new book, The Eusebian Canon Tables: Ordering Textual Knowledge in Late Antiquity (OUP, 2019), has now released. It may, however, still be en route to some retailers (e.g., Amazon as of this writing). Per the publisher’s description,

One of the books most central to late-antique religious life was the four-gospel codex, containing the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. A common feature in such manuscripts was a marginal cross-referencing system known as the Canon Tables. This reading aid was invented in the early fourth century by Eusebius of Caesarea and represented a milestone achievement both in the history of the book and in the scholarly study of the fourfold gospel. In this work, Matthew R. Crawford provides the first book-length treatment of the origins and use of the Canon Tables apparatus in any language.

HT: Larry Hurtado

Daily Gleanings: Textual Criticism (21 June 2019)

Jacob Peterson and Leigh Ann Thompson discuss how to understand the multi-spectral images being produced in the work of the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts.


Tommy Wasserman notes that

Gorgias Press has entered a partnership with De Gruyter for the electronic hosting of the Texts and Studies volumes, which means that individual chapters are now available for each volume.

For some examples, see the original post. For the full Texts and Studies series, see De Gruyter’s website.

Daily Gleanings (13 June 2019)

Todoist has a helpful guide on getting started with the Pomodoro technique. The guide comments in part:

half of all workday distractions are self-inflicted — meaning we pull ourselves out of focus

It isn’t just the time you lose on distractions, it also takes time and energy to refocus your attention. After switching gears, our mental attention can linger over the previous task for upwards of 20 minutes until regaining full concentration. Indulging the impulse to check Facebook “just for a minute” can turn into 20 minutes of trying to get back on task.

How can we teach ourselves to resist all of those self-interruptions and re-train our brains to focus? That’s where the Pomodoro technique comes in.

What makes the Pomodoro method so effective? It completely changes your sense of time.

When you start working in short, timed sessions, time is no longer an abstract concept but a concrete event.

For more about the Pomodoro technique itself, as well as its integration with Todoist, see the full post.


Peter Gurry discusses some recent work on the Harklean Syriac text.

Daily Gleanings: Craig Keener Lectures (28 May 2019)

Craig Keener gave two of the plenary lectures at this year’s Stone-Campbell Journal Conference.

The first lecture addressed Acts and especially the rhetoric involved in Paul’s speeches as reported there. The introduction and lecture begin around the 10:40 mark.

The second lecture addressed Romans. The introduction and lecture begin around the 12:00 mark.

Special kudos are due to Craig not only for his fine scholarship but also for his several custom and quite humorous illustrations that appear in the course of the lectures.

For the other two very fine plenary lectures from this year’s conference, see “Daily Gleanings: SCJ Plenaries (15 April 2019).”

Daily Gleanings (20 May 2019)

Mike Aubrey points to a full set of video recordings of lectures from the recent SEBTS conference on linguistics and NT Greek. I’ve included this playlist below as well. The “hamburger” button in the upper left-hand corner will expand the playlist contents with a list of speakers and their topics.


Larry Hurtado reviews Michael Dormandy’s recent TC essay, “How the Books Became the Bible:  The Evidence for Canon Formation From Work-Combination in Manuscripts.”