Jewish Scripture as Christian Scripture at the 2019 Stone-Campbell Journal Conference

The Jewish Scripture as Christian Scripture (JSACS) study group is pleased to welcome proposals for papers for the Stone-Campbell Journal Conference.

The conference is set to be hosted by Johnson University in Knoxville, TN, on 5–6 April 2019. Conference details are available on the Stone-Campbell Journal website.

The group’s interest is intentionally broader than the issue of “the use of the Old Testament” in the New, in the history of Christian biblical interpretation, etc. Projects are welcome to focus on either the Hebrew Bible or related versions (especially Greek) and to consider these textual traditions’ relevance for Christian interpreters, past or present.

To propose a paper for the JSACS group, please review and complete the proposal form below by the end of the day 1 December.

Soon after this time, final decisions will be made and communicated about what papers will be included in the study group’s program. Any promising proposals that the group is not able to accommodate in its program will be considered for addition to the general SCJC program.

If you have any questions, please feel free to post in the comments area below. If you have colleagues with interest in the group’s area of study, please feel free to forward this post link to them.

We look forward to seeing your proposals and to a wonderful session at the 2019 meeting!

In the (e)mail: Rodríguez and Thiessen, “The So-called Jew”

Cover image for In addition to Boccaccini and Segovia’s Paul the Jew, inbox recently saw the arrival from Fortress Press of a review copy of Rafael Rodríguez and Matthew Thiessen’s edited volume The So-Called Jew in Paul’s Letter to the Romans (2016). According to the book’s blurb:

Decades ago, Werner G. Kümmel described the historical problem of Romans as its “double character”: concerned with issues of Torah and the destiny of Israel, the letter is explicitly addressed not to Jews but to Gentiles. At stake in the numerous answers given to that question is nothing less than the purpose of Paul’s most important letter. In The So-Called Jew in Paul’s Letter to the Romans, nine Pauline scholars focus their attention on the rhetoric of diatribe and characterization in the opening chapters of the letter, asking what Paul means by the “so-called Jew” in Romans 2 and where else in the letter’s argumentation that figure appears or is implied. Each component of Paul’s argument is closely examined with particular attention to the theological problems that arise in each.

I’m looking forward to working through the text and reviewing it for the Stone-Campbell Journal.

I recently also had the privilege of reviewing Rafael’s prior If You Call Yourself a Jew: Reappraising Paul’s Letter to the Romans (Wipf & Stock, 2014). I very much appreciate the argument that Rafael brings out in that volume. Rafael has very kindly received the review, though he rightly notes some lingering questions that tend to make me lean in a bit different direction. But, I’m definitely looking forward to seeing what in the new Fortress volume may speak to those or other related matters. As H.-G. Gadamer reflects,

We say we “conduct” a conversation, but the more genuine a conversation is, the less its conduct lies within the will of either partner. Thus a genuine conversation is never the one that we wanted to conduct. Rather, it is generally more correct to say that we fall into conversation, or even that we become involved in it. The way one word follows another, with the conversation taking its own twists and reaching its own conclusion, may well be conducted in some way, but the partners conversing are far less leaders of it than the led. (Truth and Method, 401; underlining added)

In the (e)mail: Boccaccini and Segovia, “Paul the Jew”

Boccaccini and Segovia, "Paul the Jew" coverIn my email recently, I found Fortress Press had kindly provided a review copy of Gabriele Boccaccini and Carlos Segovia’s edited volume Paul the Jew: Rereading the Apostle as a Figure of Second Temple Judaism (2016). According to the book’s blurb:

The decades-long effort to understand the apostle Paul within his Jewish context is now firmly established in scholarship on early Judaism, as well as on Paul. The latest fruit of sustained analysis appears in the essays gathered here, from leading international scholars who take account of the latest investigations into the scope and variety present in Second Temple Judaism. Contributors address broad historical and theological questions—Paul’s thought and practice in relationship with early Jewish apocalypticism, messianism, attitudes toward life under the Roman Empire, appeal to Scripture, the Law, inclusion of Gentiles, the nature of salvation, and the rise of Gentile-Christian supersessionism—as well as questions about interpretation itself, including the extent and direction of a “paradigm shift” in Pauline studies and the evaluation of the Pauline legacy. Paul the Jew goes as far as any effort has gone to restore the apostle to his own historical, cultural, and theological context, and with persuasive results.

I’m looking forward to working through the text and reviewing it for the Stone-Campbell Journal.

2017 Stone-Campbell Journal Conference

Stone-Campbell Journal ConferenceRegistration for the 2017 Stone-Campbell Journal Conference is now open. The 2017 meeting will be hosted by Johnson University in Knoxville, TN, and will focus on the theme of “Communicating the Old Testament.”

This year’s conference marks the meeting’s 20th anniversary. The plenary lineup includes Ellen Davis (Duke Divinity School), Chris Heard (Pepperdine University), and Jason Bembry (Emmanuel Christian Seminary).

For additional information and to register, please see the SCJ website.

Stone-Campbell Journal 17, no. 2

The Stone-Campbell Journal 17, no. 2 is now available to members of the Stone-Campbell Scholars Community. This issue includes the following articles:

  • John Mark Hicks, “Consensus Tigurinus and a Baptismal Rapprochement between Baptists and Churches of Christ”
  • Mason Lee, “More Than the ‘Sermon on the Law’: Alexander Campbell and the Old Testament”
  • Phil Towne, “Spirituality in an Age of Technology”
  • Paul J. Kissling, “The So-Called ‘Post-Exilic’ Return: Already-But-Not-Yet In Ezra-Nehemiah”
  • Jon Carmen, “The Falling Star and the Rising Son: Luke 10:17-24 and Second Temple ‘Satan’ Traditions”
  • Les Hardin, “A Theology of the Hymns in Revelation”

Among this issue’s book reviews (pgs. 297–99) is my review of Jared Wilson’s The Storytelling God: Seeing the Glory of Jesus in His Parables (Crossway, 2014). Connections can read the review via my LinkedIn page under “Publications.”

Schreiner, The King in His Beauty

Thomas Schreiner

Baker and the Stone-Campbell Journal were kind enough to provide a copy of Tom Schreiner’s The King in His Beauty: A Biblical Theology of the Old and New Testaments. According to the publisher’s description, Schreiner:

offers a substantial and accessibly written overview of the whole Bible. He traces the storyline of the scriptures from the standpoint of biblical theology, examining the overarching message that is conveyed throughout. Schreiner emphasizes three interrelated and unified themes that stand out in the biblical narrative: God as Lord, human beings as those who are made in God’s image, and the land or place in which God’s rule is exercised. The goal of God’s kingdom is to see the king in his beauty and to be enraptured in his glory.

The text’s page on Baker’s website also provides a PDF of the front matter and first chapter. The text is currently also available for order from AmazonLogos Bible Software, and other booksellers.