Daily Gleanings: Paul in RBL (2 July 2019)

In the Review of Biblical Literature, Nicholas Elder reviews Channing Crisler’s Reading Romans as Lament: Paul’s Use of Old Testament Lament in His Most Famous Letter (Pickwick, 2016). According to Elder, The monograph’s central argument is that Paul is thoroughly indebted to the language and logic of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible lament in his letter to […]

Daily Gleanings: Craig Keener Lectures (28 May 2019)

Craig Keener gave two of the plenary lectures at this year’s Stone-Campbell Journal Conference. The first lecture addressed Acts and especially the rhetoric involved in Paul’s speeches as reported there. The introduction and lecture begin around the 10:40 mark. The second lecture addressed Romans. The introduction and lecture begin around the 12:00 mark. Special kudos […]

Anchor Bible Discounts from Logos

This month, three Anchor Bible volumes are free or deeply discounted from Logos Bible software: Joseph Fitzmyer, Romans (free) Francis Andersen, Habakkuk ($1.99) Louis Martyn, Galatians ($2.99) The Anchor Bible series is itself also on sale for 50% off. For those interested in purchasing the series, it seems the recommended method is to take advantage of the individual volume discounts […]

Gaventa, “Romans 13”

The newest issue of the Journal of Biblical Literature contains Beverly Gaventa’s essay, “Reading Romans 13 with Simone Weil: Toward a More Generous Hermeneutic.” According to the abstract, Simone Weil’s interpretation of the Iliad as a “poem of force” has resonances with Rom 1–8, reinforcing the question of how Rom 13:1–7 belongs in the larger argument […]

In the (e)mail: Rodríguez and Thiessen, “The So-called Jew”

In addition to Boccaccini and Segovia’s Paul the Jew, inbox recently saw the arrival from Fortress Press of a review copy of Rafael Rodríguez and Matthew Thiessen’s edited volume The So-Called Jew in Paul’s Letter to the Romans (2016). According to the book’s blurb: Decades ago, Werner G. Kümmel described the historical problem of Romans as its “double character”: concerned with […]

Bates, “Salvation by allegiance alone” and some theological forebears

One of the new titles in the recent Baker catalog (due for release this month) is Matthew Bates’s Salvation by Allegiance Alone: Rethinking Faith, Works, and the Gospel of Jesus the King. According to Michael Bird’s blurb, Matthew Bates argues that faith or believing is not mere assent, not easy believism, but covenantal loyalty to the […]