Jordanian lead codices report

The Centre for the Study of the Jordanian Lead Books has released a 1100+-page report on the codices that is openly available on the Centre’s website. For additional links related to the codices, see PaleoJudaica and Donnerstag Digest (March 31, 2011), A Selective Summary of Fields, “The Dead Sea Scrolls Today”, On the Web (August 24, 2011), On the Web […]

Phillips on a textual relative of the Leningrad Codex

The latest issue of the Tyndale Bulletin carries Kim Phillips’s essay, “A New Codex from the Scribe behind the Leningrad Codex: L17.” According to the abstract, Samuel b. Jacob was the scribe responsible for the production of the so-called Leningrad Codex (Firkowich B19a), currently our earliest complete Masoretic Bible codex. This article demonstrates that another codex from the Firkowich Collection, […]

The chemistry of studying the Dead Sea Scrolls

This Decoded Science article has an interesting treatment of some of the chemical elements of the study of the Dead Sea Scrolls, particularly the Copper Scroll. The article’s conclusion provides the reminder that Archaeology allows us to look into the past. However, in order for scientists to properly examine and maintain artifacts, it’s necessary to […]

Qumran Cave 12: Update 2

In a short interview published by the University of Notre Dame, James VanderKam urges caution about labeling the recent Dead Sea find as “Cave 12.” Comparisons have previously been drawn between the new find and Cave 8, which comes inside the numbering but contained no scrolls. VanderKam comments, In 1952, after the earliest scrolls finds, archaeologists […]

Qumran Cave 12: Update

Since my previous post about Qumran Cave 12, a few other noteworthy articles have cropped up, including on: FoxNews (HT: Jordan Sekulow via Craig Evans), NPR (HT: Andreas Köstenberger), and Times of Israel (HT: Douglas Estes). Much of what is in these articles about the new find is also in other reports. But, the Times […]