Daily Gleanings (27 May 2019)

Forthcoming from Eerdmans in August 2019 is Brant Pitre, Michael Barber, and John Kincaid’s edited volume Paul, a New Covenant Jew: Rethinking Pauline Theology. According to the book’s blurb,

After the landmark work of E. P. Sanders, the task of rightly accounting for Paul’s relationship to Judaism has dominated the last forty years of Pauline scholarship. Pitre, Barber, and Kincaid argue that Paul is best viewed as a new covenant Jew, a designation that allows the apostle to be fully Jewish, yet in a manner centered on the person and work of Jesus the Messiah. This new covenant Judaism provides the key that unlocks the door to many of the difficult aspects of Pauline theology.

Paul, a New Covenant Jew is a rigorous, yet accessible overview of Pauline theology intended for ecumenical audiences. In particular, it aims to be the most useful and up to date text on Paul for Catholic Seminarians. The book engages the best recent scholarship on Paul from both Protestant and Catholic interpreters and serves as a launching point for ongoing Protestant-Catholic dialogue.

The volume is currently available for preorder.


Freedom begins a new blog series, “Working in the Age of Distraction” with a goal “to explore the various tools, techniques, and strategies used by real professionals to help them succeed in a distracted world.”is

The series’s first interview with fiction writer J. T. Ellison. Of course, besides Michael Bird, not many biblical scholars write fiction. But Ellison’s core practices and advice about the craft of writing can definitely prove helpful to writers in biblical studies as well.

A few choice excerpts are:

The glory and excitement of I’m writing a new book! or I’ve just finished writing a new book! is so fleeting. The vast majority of this job is simply sitting down at your computer day after day after day and building upon the work you’ve done in the days prior.

I also always, always, have an all is lost moment around the 75k[-word] mark, though the last two books, it didn’t hit until 90k.

Writing begets writing.

The backing up of work is an underrated but vital part of the process.

The quality of your work diminishes exponentially if you’re distracted.

For the balance of the interview, see Freedom’s original blog post.

July resources from Faithlife

This month, the Logos Bible Software site is highlighting Mark Noll’s The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity (Eerdmans, 2002), which is on sale for free. Similarly, the Verbum site is highlighting John Donahue and Daniel Harrington’s Mark volume in the Sacra Pagina series (Liturgical, 2002), which is available for free.

 

Bauckham on the EerdCast

Stemming from the release of the second edition of Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony (Eerdmans, 2017), the EerdCast has a new 48-minute interview with Richard Bauckham.

HT: Rick Brannan. For other discussion of Jesus and the Eyewitnesses, see “Bauckham, ‘Jesus and the Eyewitnesses’ (2nd ed.),” “Bauckham on the Gospels as Historical Sources,” and “Gospel and Testimony.”

Bauckham, “Jesus and the Eyewitnesses” (2nd ed.)

Bauckham, "Jesus and the Eyewitnesses" (2nd ed.) coverAvailable from Eerdmans is the second edition of Richard Bauckham’s Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony. According to Eerdmans,

in this expanded second edition Bauckham has added a new preface, three substantial new chapters that respond to critics and clarify key points of his argument, and a comprehensive new bibliography.

For more information or to order, see Eerdmans’s website, Amazon, or other booksellers.

Cockerill, Hebrews

Gareth Lee Cockerill

Thanks to Eerdmans and the Stone-Campbell Journal, Gareth Lee Cockerill’s New International Commentary on the New Testament volume on Hebrews arrived recently. According to the publisher,

This commentary by Gareth Lee Cockerill offers fresh insight into the Epistle to the Hebrews, a well-constructed sermon that encourages its hearers to persevere despite persecution and hardships in light of Christ’s unique sufficiency as Savior. Cockerill analyzes the book’s rhetorical, chiastic shape and interprets each passage in light of this overarching structure. He also offers a new analysis of the epistle’s use of the Old Testament—continuity and fulfillment rather than continuity and discontinuity—and shows how this consistent usage is relevant for contemporary biblical interpretation. Written in a clear, engaging, and accessible style, this commentary will benefit pastors, laypeople, students, and scholars alike.

The Eerdmans blog has a two-part interview with Cockerill about the volume (part 1, part 2). This volume is a replacement for F. F. Bruce’s 1964 volume, which has been kept in print as a stand-alone work.