Daily Gleanings: Finds from AWOL (11 July 2019)

Oğuz Soysal and Başak Yıldız Gülşen’s Unpublished Bo-Fragments in Transliteration II (Bo 6151–Bo 9535) is freely available via open access from the University of Chicago. The description comments in part,

The monograph offers a large number of unpublished text fragments in photo and transliteration and gives succinct philological notes to these fragments. The fragments are part of a large collection that had been found during the early Turkish-German campaigns at the Hittite capital Hattusa before the Second World War.

Oğuz Soysal, a Hittitologist, and Başak Yıldız Gülşen, a curator of the Ankara Museum, provide photographs and transliterations of each piece.… Photos offer the users of his book all the information needed on the sign forms of the fragments, and the transliterations show how the authors have interpreted those signs. Wherever necessary, the authors give philological notes to explain certain forms or to present relevant text variants. Each fragment, if possible, is accompanied by information on its assignment to a Hittite text or text genre, the date of the composition, the fragmentʼs measurements, and previous bibliography.

HT: AWOL


Per the Digital Classicist Wiki,

Scholarship in classics frequently involves dealing with unusual alphabets, scripts, and letterforms. The Unicode standard is designed to encode the characters of the world’s writing systems (living and ancient), but it does not attempt to encode glyphs, which have been ceded to fonts and type design.

The wiki provides a helpful list of “pages dealing with fonts and specialized typographic needs of classicists.”

For more about Unicode, see “Typing Biblical Languages in Unicode.”

HT: AWOL

Daily Gleanings (3 May 2019)

Mike Aubrey is “rethinking transitivity and the Greek perfect.”


The Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity provides a database that is

making readily accessible and searchable as much as possible of the early evidence for the cult of Christian saints (up to around AD 700), with key texts presented in their original language, all with English translation and brief contextual commentary.

Work on the project was set to conclude 31 December 2018 with some minor work continuing into this year.

HT: AWOL

Humanities Commons

The MLA has started a new initiative, named the Humanities Commons. According to the Commons’s introductory webinar registration page,

Imagine a humanities network with the sharing power of Academia.edu, the archival quality of an institutional repository, and a commitment to using and contributing to open source software. Now imagine that this network is not-for-profit. It doesn’t want to sell your data or generate profit from your intellectual property. That’s Humanities Commons. Run by a nonprofit consortium of scholarly societies, Humanities Commons wants to help you curate your online presence, expand the reach of your scholarship—whatever form it may take—and connect with other scholars who share your interests.

For more information, view the webinar or peruse the Commons’s website.

HT: AWOL