Old Latin Editions

A major critical edition of the Old Latin is underway under the auspices of the Vetus Latina Institute. Some volumes have already been released. But, others are still forthcoming.

Meanwhile, the only complete edition of the Old Latin remains that published by Pierre Sabatier (Reims: 1739–1749; see Würthwein, Text of the Old Testament, 147). A later version of this edition, with some volumes reissued in later years, seems to have had three volumes, all of which are available on Internet Archive:

Of course, if there are additional volumes that I have missed, comments identifying those volumes and links to them (if they have been made available online) are most welcome.

Codex Sarravianus Online

Internet Archive has a full-text PDF of Codex Sarravianus, a 5th-century majuscule witness to the Septuagint. The text contains A. W. Sijthoff’s 1897 photographic reproduction of the manuscript.

For reader’s convenience, the bottom of each page indicates the portion of the biblical text covered in that page’s facsimile, with hand-written notes over the facsimiles to indicate the starts of chapters.

The quality of the scan seems to be quite good. Below is an excerpt from Deut 30:2 (on pg. 248) showing the asterisks and metobelus used to mark what seems to be a revision toward the text represented in the MT.

Moltmann and Ricoeur in Dialog

At the Logos Academic Blog, Stephen Chan has a substantive essay on interaction between Jürgen Moltmann and Paul Ricoeur that focuses on the centrality of hope to Christian eschatology. In part, Chan suggests:

If symbols do give rise to thought … , then the symbolic language of biblical apocalyptic literature is irreducible and too important to be left behind in our theological construction.

For the full essay, see Chan’s original post at theLAB.

The Major Critical Edition Data for Acts Is Online

At the 2017 SBL, Holger Strutwolf made the Editio Critica Maior data for Acts freely available online. According to Peter Gurry’s report:

There are features in the interface for commenting on the variant unit and a link that will take you to the local stemma and coherence modules for said variant unit. There is also an option to see the unedited collation data, a list of patristic citations (fuller than in the print edition as I understand it), the Vetus Latina collations, and a nice feature which tells you how many conjectures have been offered for the variant unit and a link that will take you to the data in the Amsterdam Database of New Testament Conjectural Emendation.

To access the text, see INTF’s virtual manuscript room. Although ECM is itself available also for the synoptics’ parallel passages and the catholic letters, the online version currently includes only the Acts material.

For additional discussion and a short video clip from the occasion, see Peter Gurry’s original post.

TopTracker

TopTracker provides a straight-forward, free time tracking utility that works on both Windows and OS X. The utility allows commenting on each session tracked (e.g., words written during that session). It also allows export via CSV, from where numbers can be crunched further in Excel to see how well progress is going.

By default, TopTracker will upload screenshots periodically while it’s running, but this feature can be disabled and other elements customized in the program’s settings.

For other similar utilities, see the Zapier blog. For additional discussion of the value of tracking writing progress or other “deep work,” see Paul Silvia’s book How to Write a Lot or Cal Newport’s Deep Work.