Daily Gleanings: Paul (16 December 2019)

In one of his final posts, (the now late) Larry Hurtado reviews Archibald Hunter’s Paul and His Predecessors.

Hurtado summarizes,

Hunter’s thesis was that, although the Apostle Paul was an innovative and impressive thinker and defender of his mission, he was also heavily indebted to “those who were in Christ” before him. Hunter conducted several investigations of Pauline texts to demonstrate this, and he did so persuasively in my view.

As early as 2004, the full text of the revised 1961 edition of Hunter’s volume was made available on Internet Archive by the Universal Library Project.

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Daily Gleanings: Saying No (13 December 2019)

Michael Hyatt suggests five reasons to cultivate the skill of gracefully saying no, lest:

  1. Other peoples’ priorities will take precedence over ours.
  2. Mere acquaintances—people we barely know!—will crowd out time with family and close friends.
  3. We will not have the time we need for rest and recovery.
  4. We will end up frustrated and stressed.
  5. We won’t be able to say yes to the really important things.

Of course, saying “no” doesn’t need to use (and often is best without) that precise word. For a number of helpful templates that can help you say no gracefully see Greg McKeown’s Essentialism, ch. 11.

For further discussion, see also “Inside ‘Yes’ is ‘No.'”

Daily Gleanings: German (12 December 2019)

Now a good five years in the making Alan Ng and Sarah Korpi, of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, have made openly available online a grammar that

guides a learner who has no previous German experience to gain the ability to accurately understand formal written German prose, aided only by a comprehensive dictionary.

Even for those who might not use the grammar in conjunction with the German coursework offered through UW-Madison, it may prove a helpful and accessible reference.

HT: Ben Blackwell

Daily Gleanings: Time Blocking (11 December 2019)

Stephen Altrogge has a helpful post introducing time blocking. Stephen begins,

Most people use their calendars reactively, meaning that they put things on their calendars as they come up. Someone wants to grab coffee? On the calendar. The boss calls a meeting? On the calendar. A conference call with the publishing team? On the calendar.

The problem with this approach is that it can lead to the day getting very chopped up, which then makes it difficult to get things done which require in-depth thinking. If you’re constantly interrupted by meetings, phone calls, and emails, it’s tough to make progress on meaningful tasks.

Enter time blocking.

Some of the key steps Stephen outlines for time blocking are to:

  1. Set your priorities.
  2. Create deep work blocks.
  3. Add shallow work and reactive blocks.
  4. Assign specific tasks to time blocks.

Stephen also recommends that, when time blocking, you “overestimate the time it will take you to complete tasks”—since we have a tendency to do just the opposite—and “create an overflow day if you find yourself constantly falling behind in your schedule.”

For the balance of Stephen’s discussion, see his original post on the Freedom blog.

For more about time blocking, see this blog post series.

Daily Gleanings: Logos (10 December 2019)

There’s no doubt about it—you can drop a lot of money on biblical studies software.

For Logos users, there’ve been ways to gift resources in the past. But at least for a good while, this was comparatively cumbersome.

The Logos store now, however, has a proper gift card purchasing option. I haven’t used this as yet. And from the comments on the page, there look to be some limitations with the current implementation.

But for those of you who are considering or who have also joined the Logos community, this offering may prove a helpful addition.